Courageously honoring our healthcare commitments

Originally published by FierceHealthcare‘s Hospital Impact in 2010.

170310 Fierce-Healthcare-Hospital-Impact

Updated — 2018.

180219 Honor commitments

What is your healthcare organization’s mission statement? Vision? Values?

What is your specific role in ensuring that your organization achieves this mission and vision? How often do you assess the impact you are having on this achievement?

Does your organization have a culture that allows you to ask questions such as:

  • Does this new initiative align with our mission, vision, values?
  • What is my specific role?
  • What level of priority is my role?
  • What does success look like for me and for the initiative?

In Hoshin Kanri, there is a term known as “catchball”. Catchball is a top-down, bottom-up communication and negotiation process where the collective wisdom of an organization is gathered to develop a focused plan that aligns the entire organization to achieve its mission and vision while living its values. When done successfully, this process improves outcomes, conserves resources (capital, human, etc.) and improves engagement as individuals, teams, departments — all stakeholders — know exactly how they are contributing to the end goal.

At Studer Group we use the Leader Evaluation Manager (LEM) as a tool in this alignment, action, and accountability process.

Successful healthcare organizations ensure that the “alignment of the entire organization” truly means that every individual’s role within the organization is defined, specific, measurable, prioritized, action-oriented, attainable, realistic, timely, understood (by the individual and the organization) and aligned with the critical few initiatives required to achieve the organization’s mission and vision [“SMART” goals plus] while living its values.

NOTE: This is absolutely critical and yet it is not enough in healthcare.

Truly successful healthcare organizations also much have a culture (a container) where all organization members feel safe, empowered and are expected to raise concerns regarding areas of focus, initiatives, projects and behaviors that appear to be misaligned with the organization’s mission, vision and values. In fact, team members need to not only feel safe, but recognized for the courageous vulnerability and commitment to do so.

And yet this still not enough in healthcare.

These same team members must also feel safe, empowered and expected to raise concerns with the mission, vision and values of the organization itself. Working in healthcare, we all have made a commitment — a commitment to the greater good and to helping to position our patients and families, our doctors and staff, and our communities for optimal safety and outcomes.

Question: Is your healthcare organization’s mission, vision and values in line with this greater good?

If so, fantastic … now let’s ensure you are using tools (such as LEM) to create alignment, action and accountability to achieve this impact.

If not, it’s time to re-engage your organization (your board, leadership and individuals throughout your system) and re-establish an aligned mission, vision and values.

We have a great opportunity to live our integrity and significantly improve the healthcare system. And by choosing to work in healthcare, we have each also taken on a commitment to the greater good. To lead and to serve for others. Time is short, as people and communities are not being optimally served — and in many cases are being harmed.

Together let’s be courageously vulnerable and align, be in action, be accountable and ensure all we do leads and serves all those we are blessed to care for and care about.

 

180219 Courageous vulnerability

 

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